Christianity

Evangelical Christians Try to Convert Muslims

March 25, 2001

Source: The Philadelphia Inquirer

http://inq.philly.com/content/inquirer/2001/03/25/city/EVANG25.htm

On March 25, 2001, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that "responding to Muslims has become a keen concern for many Christians as they watch Islam's steady growth in size and respectability in this country. While Roman Catholic and most Mainline Protestant churches promote theological tolerance and dialogue," evangelical leaders have rallied "their troops...

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Catholic Schools Draw Students from Many Faiths

March 25, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On March 25, 2001, The Boston Globe reported that, "nationally, 13.6 percent of Catholic school students are non-Catholic." Many are not even Christian. Catholic schools are appealing for their safety, strong academics, a moral-based education, the discipline, and the small-school atmosphere. This makes it difficult for Catholic schools to maintain their Catholic identity.

Korean Congregation Maintains Lunch Tradition in Spite of Fire

March 25, 2001

Source: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution

On March 25, 2001, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reported on the "New Church of Atlanta, a nondenominational Korean congregation that lost its church" in January in a fire. The congregation had been holding services in space borrowed from another church, but decided to "return to the only structure at New Church that survived the televised fire -- the fellowship hall," so that they could go back to the 11 a.m. service, which allowed them to eat lunch together afterward. At their big lunches, "Everybody...

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Survey Shows Black Churches Are Very Involved in Social Service

March 25, 2001

Source: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

On March 25, 2001, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported that "a survey conducted last year found that 92 percent of black churches offer youth programs and 86 percent provide cash assistance to needy people...The survey was part of the larger 'Faith Communities Today' study...76 percent of black congregations were involved in voter registration or voter education efforts. A total of 75 percent of the black churches had a food pantry or soup kitchen."

Bush Courts Catholics and Loses Support from Evangelicals

March 23, 2001

Source: Los Angeles Times

On March 23, 2001, the Los Angeles Times reported that "President Bush is reaching out to Roman Catholics, courting one of the most important groups of swing voters whose support has gone increasingly to Republican presidential candidates in the last three elections." At the same time, he is losing support among evangelicals, who are partly upset by his focus on Catholics.

Church of Latter-Day Saints Builds New Temple in Omaha

March 22, 2001

Source: Omaha World-Herald

On March 22, 2001, the Omaha World-Herald reported that "the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints celebrated the completion of its new temple in Omaha...Named the Winter Quarters Nebraska Temple, it is... one of a new generation of smaller temples that the church is building to accommodate the needs of its rapidly growing membership...The Winter Quarters Nebraska Temple will serve more than 35,000 Latter-day Saints living in Nebraska, Iowa and parts of South Dakota, Kansas and Missouri."

Lawsuit Filed over Removal of Ten Commandments from Courthouse

March 21, 2001

Source: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

On March 21, 2001, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported that Americans United for Separation of Church and State "filed a civil rights lawsuit in federal court in Pittsburgh yesterday, trying to force the removal of a Ten Commandments display from the Allegheny County Courthouse...The lawsuit...asserts that the plaque violates the First Amendment's establishment clause, the basis for the country's separation of church and state."

City Council Votes to Keep Ten Commandments and Add Display

March 21, 2001

Source: The Denver Post

On March 21, 2001, The Denver Post reported that "the Grand Junction City Council [in Colorado] voted 5-2 this week to keep a granite monument depicting the Ten Commandments at city hall" and also to post a disclaimer on the commandments stating in part, "This display is not meant to support any particular religious belief." The display is intended to avoid a lawsuit. "The council also will create a cultural heritage plaza around the Ten Commandments."

New Denver Auxiliary Bishop Wants to Make Hispanics Feel Welcome

March 21, 2001

Source: The Denver Post

On March 21, 2001, The Denver Post reported on the Rev. Jose Gomez from Houston, who is about to become auxiliary bishop of the Denver Catholic Archdiocese. "He said his main goal involving the more than 120,000 Hispanic Catholics in the Denver archdiocese 'is to make them feel welcome in the Catholic Church.'...Over the past few decades, thousands of Hispanic Catholics have left to join evangelical Protestant churches, saying they find those congregations more welcoming."

East Boston Church Accommodates Growing Numbers of Latino Immigrants

March 18, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On March 18, 2001, The Boston Globe reported on the hundreds of Latino immigrants who attend the Most Holy Redeemer Church in East Boston. The church "strains to accommodate everyone. [Rev. Robert R.] Hennessey estimates that 3,200 come to Spanish Masses each weekend...The church has been helping immigrants ease into American life for years."

Judge Asserts Right to Display Ten Commandments in Public

March 18, 2001

Source: The Columbus Dispatch

On March 18, 2001, The Columbus Dispatch reported that "a movement to display the Ten Commandments in public has found an ally in a second Ohio judge...Judge Nelfred Kimerline said he hung a framed poster depicting the commandments in his courtroom in support of a...judge being sued by the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio...The ACLU suit says that DeWeese's poster violates the constitutional separation of church and state." Kimerline insists they are simply good rules to live by and are not shoved "down anyone's throat...

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Resolution to Controversy over Prayer at City Council Meetings Reached

March 18, 2001

Source: The Columbus Dispatch

On March 18, 2001, The Columbus Dispatch reported on "a controversy that erupted at recent meetings of the Marion City Council [in Ohio], where the Lord's Prayer is recited before every meeting...City law requires that a prayer be read." One citizen suggested a silent or nonsectarian prayer be read so as not to exclude non-Christians. "From now on, various ministers will be on hand to open the meeting with a nonsectarian prayer." Most residents nevertheless support the use of the Lord's prayer.

Bush Administration Responds to Criticism of Initiative from Christian Right

March 17, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On March 17, 2001, The Boston Globe reported that, "to repair the rift with the Christian right, White House officials privately have repudiated critical remarks that the director of the office of faith-based initiatives made about evangelicals, and have assured conservative leaders their concerns will be addressed." Some of these leaders asked for DiIulio's resignation, while others merely see him as a political liability for Bush. In a recent speech DiIulio "accused conservative Christian leaders of lacking commitment to the poor...

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Catholic Nun Teaches Tai Chi Classes

March 17, 2001

Source: The Houston Chronicle

On March 17, 2001, The Houston Chronicle reported on Sister Carletta LaCour, who teaches Tai Chi at the Christian Renewal Center in Dickinson, Texas. "Though part of the benefit of practicing the moves is physical, LaCour also emphasizes the spiritual." She sees no incongruence between Catholicism and Tai Chi.

Court Rules That Ohio State Motto Is Constitutional

March 17, 2001

Source: The Columbus Dispatch

On March 17, 2001, The Columbus Dispatch reported that the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals "ruled 9-4 that Ohio's 42-year-old state motto -- 'With God, all things are possible' -- is constitutional. The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio, which challenged the motto on grounds that it is an unconstitutional endorsement of religion by the state, said it is considering an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court." The circuit court majority agreed that "Ohio's motto did not have the primary purpose of advancing religion."

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