Christianity

Catholic Priest Opposes Negative Depictions of Jews

August 4, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On August 4, 2001, The Boston Globe interviewed the Rev. Robert W. Bullock, a Catholic priest who "has spent many o his 72 years thinking about Judaism...He has become a voice on the impact of the Holocaust on Catholocism and Christianity." He wrote that "the problem is not in the classroom; it is in the church." In the interview he explained that "primarily [these problems] arise in the lectionary...[For example,] there is the problematic depction of Jews as the mob crying out for the death of Jesus."

40 Chaplains Hired for 2002 Olympics

August 4, 2001

Source: deseretnews.com

On August 4, 2001, deseretnews.com reported that "to make sure everyone is taken care of, Olympic organizers have chosen 40 spiritual advisers to be on call during the 17 days of competition [at the 2002 Winter Games]. Their duties will range from hosting regular worship services at the Olympic Village to being available for any athlete, any time...The chaplains ...come from nearly every sect imaginable...There are Catholic priests, a Jewish rabbi, an Islamic imam and Protestant ministers from several denominations. [A chaplain]...

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Senator Demands God's Name Be Used in Oaths

August 3, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On August 3, 2001, The Boston Globe reported that Republican Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama "scolded Judiciary Committee chairman Patrick Leahy, Democrat of Vermont, for leaving out 'so help me God' when swearing in nominees and others who testify in front of his panel." The Constitution does not require an oath invoking God's name. "Sessions said that traditionally the reference to God has been included and he is considering an effort to make the language part of Senate rules."

Justice Displays Ten Commandments in Montgomery Court Building

August 2, 2001

Source: The New York Times

On August 2, 2001, The New York Times reported that "Chief Justice Roy Moore unveiled...in the judicial building in Montgomery a...display of historical quotations that was topped by carved tablets of the Ten Commandments. The display fulfills a campaign pledge the judge made last year to acknowledge in a public place God's influence on the law."

Neighbors Take Issue with Religious Lawn Statue

August 2, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On August 2, 2001, The Boston Globe reported on Jamal Saba of Canton, Mich. "When Saba moved his family into a $500,000 dream house," he included a statue of the Virgin Mary in the $10,000 landscaping design. "He was shocked recently to find an anonymous letter in his mailbox, telling him that religion should stay inside the home, and later to discover that he faces a legal challenge from his homeowners association over the statue...'They hate me because the Virgin Mary went up,' said Saba."

Justice Displays Ten Commandments in Montgomery Court Building

August 2, 2001

Source: Los Angeles Times

On August 2, 2001, the Los Angeles Times reported that "in the wee hours of the morning when nobody was looking, [Chief Justice Roy] Moore and a couple of workmen sneaked a 5,280-pound granite monument to the Ten Commandments into the rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court...Moore paid for it with 'private contributions,' he said, and didn't tell any of the other eight justices...Predictably, the monument has caused a stir. Several Christian groups immediately voiced support, while the Alabama chapter of the American Civil Liberties...

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Mormon Denomination Changes Name

July 31, 2001

Source: The New York Times

On July 31, 2001, The New York Times reported on a Mormon denomination in Missouri that was called, until April 6, the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. "Now it is the Community of Christ -- the same organization, rechristened...The Community of Christ and the Mormons...trace themselves to the church begun on April 6, 1830, by Joseph Smith...Some [Mormon church members] regrouped and formally began the Reorganized Church on April 6, 1860." The church has changed its name to better reflect its current...

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HUD Withholds Funds from Youth Center with "Spiritual Rap Sessions"

July 30, 2001

Source: The Hartford Courant

On July 30, 2001, The Hartford Courant reported that officials of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development threatened to withhold $9,000 from Barbara Miller's I Have a Friend Youth Center in Hartford after "she supplemented the tutoring and after-school activities she offered by asking a minister she knew to hold what she called 'spiritual rap sessions' once a week...HUD's decision drew an angry response from Miller...She said the sessions were not Bible classes or religious instruction and filled an important need...

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Churches Still Largely Segregated

July 29, 2001

Source: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

On July 29, 2001, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported that "through their efforts, [religious groups] sometimes foster tolerance and sometimes foster intolerance, said John Green,...who researches grassroots politics...In spite of efforts to foster a multicultural society, churches remain largely segregated, Green said...The standout in church integration, however, are the Pentecostal congregations."

Population of Korean Church-Goers Grows

July 29, 2001

Source: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution

On July 29, 2001, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reported on Atlanta's 200 Korean churches. "First Korean Presbyterian and Korean Community Presbyterian, both with about 1,000 members, are the largest Korean churches in the Southeast...The two churches' success reflects the explosive growth of metro Atlanta's Korean population since the churches began in the mid-1970s. Census figures show the Korean population here at more than 28,000, but Korean community leaders say the number is closer to 50,000. Korean...

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Daughter Carries on with Father's Teachings

July 28, 2001

Source: The Arizona Republic

On July 28, 2001, The Arizona Republic reported on Torkom Saraydarian. "Through his philosophy, which he called Ageless Wisdom, he drew from the teachings of the world's religions to help others fulfill their destinies. He died at age 80 in 1997...Today in Cave Creek, his daughter, Gita Saraydarian, carries on her father's legacy by publishing his books and teaching classes...'It's a blend of Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity and Sufi,'" she said.

Growing Religious Diversity in Bible Belt

July 28, 2001

Source: Messenger-Inquirer

http://www.messenger-inquirer.com/columnists/owen/3382699.htm

On July 28, 2001, the Messenger-Inquirer reported on the growing religious diversity in the Bible Belt. "About 200 Jains and about as many Sikhs live in west-central Kentucky and Tennessee now... Bowling Green has 2,000 actively practicing Muslims, mostly Bosnian immigrants... Nashville has about 24,000 Hispanics, compared to 2,700 a decade ago." Thomas Russell and...

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$2.5 Million Awarded to Man Fired for Not Working on Sabbath

July 27, 2001

Source: Intermountain Jewish News

On July 27, 2001, Intermountain Jewish News reported that the "Pueblo man who was found by a federal jury...to be a victim or religious discrimination said he hopes his legal victory will work to protect the rights of other religious minorities, especially those who -- like himself -- observe the Sabbath on Saturday instead of Sunday...[Don] Reed [the Pueblo man] is a member of a 'nondenominational' Christian group which, like Jews, marks the Sabbath from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday." Reed said "the significance of...

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Ten Facts Illustrate Atlanta's Growing Religious Diversity

July 26, 2001

Source: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution

On July 26, 2001, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reported that "during the second half of the 20th century, metro Atlanta...became a richly diverse religious community." The article listed ten facts that exemplified the growing diversity. For example, "Hindus have several worship centers in Atlanta" and "Pagans and witches worship in their own ceremonies throughout the metro area."

Court Rules in Favor of Moment of Silence Law

July 26, 2001

Source: The Washington Post

Onn July 26, 2001, The Washington Post published a piece on the court decision to allow a moment of silence in Virginia schools. "Even the judges who this week embraced Virginia's moment of silence law agree that for it to be constitutional, it must neither encourage nor discourage religion." However, "the children who went to court to fight the moment of silence know well that some of their peers are hungry to use that minute to promote the majority faith. There are already reports statewide of teachers encouraging children to...

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