The Khalsa

It was on BaisakhiBaisakhi is held on the first day of the lunar month of Baisakh, which falls in the month of April. One of the main events of the day is the raising of a new Nishan Sahib, the Sikh flag. Baisakhi also marks the anniversary of the first initiations into th..., traditionally an important harvest festival in the Punjab, in 1699 that a new form of the SikhSikhs call their tradition the “Sikh Panth,” meaning the “community (panth) of the disciples of the Guru.” The tradition reveres a lineage of ten Gurus, beginning with Guru Nanak in the 16th century and coming to a clos. with the death of Guru Gob... community was born. SikhsSikhs call their tradition the “Sikh Panth,” meaning the “community (panth) of the disciples of the Guru.” The tradition reveres a lineage of ten Gurus, beginning with Guru Nanak in the 16th century and coming to a clos. with the death of Guru Gob... from around the region had gathered as was their practice on Baisakhi. At Guru Gobind Singh’sGuru Gobind Singh (1666-1708) was the tenth Guru of the Sikh tradition. He is primarily known for establishing the community of Sikh initiates called the Khalsa and for installing the Adi Granth as his successor, thereby closing the line of Gurus. request, they gathered in Anandpur, where he had his headquarters.

According to Sikh tradition, Guru Gobind SinghGuru Gobind Singh (1666-1708) was the tenth Guru of the Sikh tradition. He is primarily known for establishing the community of Sikh initiates called the Khalsa and for installing the Adi Granth as his successor, thereby closing the line of Gurus. appeared from his tent that day and made a terrifying request. He asked for five Sikhs to offer their heads in sacrifice. People were frightened and silent. But five Sikhs, one after another, responded to his call. Each was led into the tent where the Guru had secretly tethered five goats. And after each of the brave Sikhs had disappeared into the tent, the Guru returned for the next, his sword dripping with the blood of one of the goats. This continued until it seemed that all five men had been slain. Then Guru Gobind SinghGuru Gobind Singh (1666-1708) was the tenth Guru of the Sikh tradition. He is primarily known for establishing the community of Sikh initiates called the Khalsa and for installing the Adi Granth as his successor, thereby closing the line of Gurus. did not emerge from the tent for a long time. When he did, he was followed by the five Sikhs, dressed in new garments like the Guru and bearing new swords.

Guru Gobind SinghUpon initiation into the Khalsa, Sikh men assume the name Singh, “Lion.” finally made his intentions clear. He wished to establish a new Sikh order—the KhalsaGuru Gobind Singh, the tenth Sikh Guru, created the Khalsa, the “alliance of the pure” in 1699. When a Sikh comes of age or is ready for a greater level of commitment, he or she joins the Khalsa through the special initiation known as “taking amrit..... The word derives from an ArabicClassical Arabic is the language of revelation in Islam as recorded in the Qur’an. Muslims consider every word of the Qur’an to be a direct utterance of God. The Arabic language itself is regarded as perfectly suited as the instrument for God’s comm... word khalis, meaning “pure.” The Khalsa would be a disciplined body of God’sGod is a term used to refer to the Divine, the Supreme being, Transcendent deity, or Ultimate reality. own saintsSaints are human beings whose lives have displayed extraordinary holiness and devotion. As such they become examples for others. Indeed some of the faithful may understand them to be intermediaries and seek their help in time of need. Roman Catholics and ... and soldiers, men and women of courage and dedication who would adhere to the highest codes of conduct and the highest morality. Members of the Khalsa would never flinch in performing their duty to GodGod is a term used to refer to the Divine, the Supreme being, Transcendent deity, or Ultimate reality. and their fellow human beings, just as the five Sikhs had willingly offered their lives to the Guru.

The first five members of the Khalsa, called the panj piaras, the “beloved five,” were publicly initiated. They drank from a common bowl the nectar called amritAmrit means “immortal nectar,” and “taking amrit” is a term used for initiation into the Khalsa, the order of fully committed Sikhs. A bowl of water with sugar crystals is stirred with a double-edged sword, while sacred hymns are recited, infusing..., prepared and consecrated by stirring sugar crystals into water with a double-edged sword and reciting the words of Guru Nanak’sGuru Nanak (1469-1539) was the first teacher of the community of disciples that became known as the Sikhs. His songs in praise of the formless and transcendent God are a cherished part of the Sikh scripture, the Adi Granth. hymn, the JapjiSikhs recite five prayers daily, the most important being the morning prayer, the “Japji,” which was recited by Guru Nanak (1469-1539) each morning. The opening stanza of the Japji, known as the “Mul Mantar” affirms that there is one God, without ..., and some hymns of the other gurus. Then Guru Gobind Singh received many others into the new order of the Khalsa. He instructed them to wear the five distinct symbols of the Khalsa at all times: the kirpanThe kirpan is a sword, more commonly a small knife, carried by initiated Sikhs who have become members of the Khalsa, the order of fully committed Sikhs. It is one of five symbols of Sikh identity., a small sword; the karha, an iron or steel bracelet; the kachhera, a military form of undershorts; the kangha, a wooden comb worn in the hair, and the kes, uncut hair, covered with a turbanSikh men wear a turban and Sikh women wear a long head scarf known as a chunni in fulfillment of one of the basic vows taken when joining the Khalsa (the order of committed Sikhs)—to leave the hair uncut as a sign of complete dedication to God. This is .... The new initiates were given new names, Singh (“lion”) for men, and KaurAll Sikh women who have joined the Khalsa assume the name Kaur, “Princess.” (“princess”) for women. This was a new birth. The khalsis were to consider themselves born in Anandpur, as sons and daughters of Guru Gobind Singh and his wife Sahib Kaur.


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