Native American Traditions

Sacred Land Film Project

Sacred Land Film Project produces a variety of media and educational materials  to deepen public understanding of sacred places, indigenous cultures and environmental justice.

‘Their greed is gonna kill us’: Indian Country fights against more fracking

June 12, 2020

 

A few winters ago, Sam Sage started getting strange phone calls. 

Families living in rural areas south-west of Counselor, New Mexico, were telling him they saw sickly bull snakes and near-death rattlers above ground during the snowy, winter months of the south. Sage, the administrator at the Counselor Chapter House, a Navajo local government center, was incredulous.

“In February? There’s no snakes in February,” he said.

Sage...

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As Covid-19 tears through Navajo Nation, young people step up to protect their elders

May 26, 2020

 

Michelle Tom stared into the screen. The Navajo doctor had just finished a grueling shift at the Winslow Indian Health Care Center urgent care facility in Winslow, Ariz., caring for Covid-19 patients. Now, she was spending her Friday night speaking via livestream to Native American youth about the pandemic.

“I’ve seen it hit everyone,” she said of the coronavirus. “But I have the strength of my ancestors, the strength of my prayers, and the strength of all of you. We have to keep talking about it, especially to our young people.”

In recent weeks,...

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MSU researcher merges science with Native American tradition

March 30, 2020

When Michigan State University graduate student Jared Gregorini studies in the forest, he often leaves a tobacco plant in it before he starts.

This is because Gregorini, also known as Leading Crow, is a Native American.

Before becoming a biological conservation researcher, he worked with the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians as an assistant biologist.  He is from Ontario, but his research focuses on Michigan’s eastern Upper Peninsula, an environment similar to Ontario’s.

The plant Gregorini gives to the forest is usually tobacco, which is...

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President Nixon and the sacred lake: Bill preserves history

February 7, 2020

It was 1970, the U.S. president was Richard Nixon and members of a small Native American community in northern New Mexico traveled to Washington to press their case for reclaiming a sacred alpine lake from federal control.

The story of the return of Blue Lake and 75 square miles (195 square kilometers) of surrounding national forest land to the people of Taos Pueblo — finalized with Nixon’s signature in December 1970 — is being retold 50 years later, as tribal leaders and state legislators look for ways to preserve documentation and memories of the landmark victory for...

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Native Traditions in Boston

Native Americans from several dozen tribes have inhabited what we call Greater Boston for at least 10,000 years. Despite centuries of ill treatment, coerced conversion attempts, social marginalization, and painful acculturation, the complex nature-based spiritual traditions of nearly thirty distinct tribes and bands survive in New England today. The more than 6,000 Native Americans who call Greater Boston home are active through a range of social and community organizations. Throughout the year, a variety of Native ceremonies, rituals and pow wows attract anywhere from a few dozen to...

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Tohono O’odham historic sites at risk over border wall construction

January 21, 2020

The leader of the Tohono O’odham Nation is once again vowing to fight against the construction of new border fencing along their ancestral lands in southwestern Arizona, as works crews encroach sites of historical and cultural significance to the O’odham people.

Some of the key locations include an ancient burial site located in the immediate vicinity of existing border barriers, as well as Quitobaquito Springs — the only natural source of water for dozens of miles around — where construction crews discovered in October fragments of human remains...

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Sheridan VA employs sweat ceremonies in holistic health program

January 2, 2020

From the sacred circle on the outskirts of the Sheridan VA campus, the historic brick buildings that were once known as Fort Mackenzie are obscured by trees covered in blooms of hoar frost. A light snow materializes and mingles with floating specks of ash. The ash comes from a large fire banked against cinder blocks and covered in a layer of igneous rocks. Five-gallon buckets of water sit nearby, some with bundles of grass soaking inside. Others line the edge of a small domed structure covered in blankets: the sweat lodge.

Original Source: Laramie Boomerang
Source: ...

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Trinity Episcopal holds Native American worship service

November 22, 2019
On Sunday in commemoration of Native American Heritage Month, Trinity Episcopal Church of Redlands held its 11th annual Native American Worship Service. As the program stated, the unique service was designed to “reflect the respectful integration of elements of Native American culture and tradition within the context of the Episcopal Church's liturgy.” The service was well attended; colorful in both flavor and proceedings. Source: ... Read more about Trinity Episcopal holds Native American worship service

Understanding Native American religion is important for resolving the Dakota Access Pipeline crisis

November 14, 2019
In recent weeks, protests against the building of the Dakota Access Pipeline across North Dakota have escalated. Native American elders, families and children have set up tipis and tents on a campsite near the pipeline’s path in the hope of stopping the pipeline’s construction.
Dave Archambault Jr., the leader of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe that is leading the efforts to stop...
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