Native American Traditions

Fightin' Whities Mascot Draws Attention to Racist Caricature

March 17, 2002

Source: The Denver Post

On March 17, 2002, The Denver Post featured an article on the Fightin' Whities, the new satirical mascot of an intramural basketball team at the Univeristy of Northen Colorado. The mascot was designed to aid the protest against a local high school mascot. "Dan Ninham, a member of the Oneida Nation... formed a multiethnic committee to oppose the Fightin' Reds mascot at Eaton High School - a caricature of a defiant Indian with a misshapen nose, eagle feather and loincloth. Ninham has called it 'one of the most blatantly racist...

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'Hiroshima Flame' Carried Across America as Memorial

February 12, 2002

Source: The San Francisco Chronicle

On February 12, 2002, The San Francisco Chronicle reported that "the 'Hiroshima Flame' kindled 57 years ago from embers of the atomic bombing of Japan... wends its way across America... Its escorts are a diverse group: a seemingly indefatigable Japanese nun who's walked across the United States four times, a Native American elder from Massachusetts, an idealistic 15-year-old girl from Honolulu, and others united in the hope that their unusual spiritual pilgrimage will foster world peace... The five-month journey...

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Prayer Vigil Protests Construction on Sacred Land

January 24, 2002

Source: Star Tribune

On January 24, 2002, the Star Tribune reported that "protesters who want the University of Minnesota to pull out of the Mount Graham telescope project in Arizona are holding a 24-hour prayer vigil outside the university president's house... The group, including representatives of the American Indian Movement (AIM), the Mount Graham Coalition and local activists, set up a red tepee Wednesday afternoon outside the fence bordering Eastcliff, the St. Paul home of university President Mark Yudof. They say construction of the telescope...

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Editorial: "American Dream" Explores Spirituality and Commercialism

January 14, 2002

Source: The Boston Globe

On January 14, 2002, The Boston Globe featured "American Dream," an editorial about America's search for meaning. "Considered a sacred object in [Native American] culture, the web-like dream catcher - which is supposed to hang above a baby's cradle to trap nightmares and let good dreams into the soul - has become a staple in mall trinket stores... But while this popularization of the spiritual can be written off as the co-opting and secularizing of a belief system, it is, at its heart, a search for meaning... Our society is a...

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Fire Breaks Out at New York Cathedral

December 19, 2001

Source: Newsday

On December 19, 2001, Newsday reported that a "fire that swept through the gift shop of the world's largest Gothic cathedral," the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York. "From its inception, the cathedral was chartered not just as the mother church of the Episcopal Diocese of New York but as a house of prayer whose bronze doors were open to all people... Indeed, in recent years, sermons have been delivered by rabbis, Zen Buddhists and African animists. The Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, retired U.S. Army Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf...

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Tribes form Coalition to Save Sacred Lake

December 1, 2001

Source: The New York Times

On Saturday December 1, 2001, The New York Times reported that "environmental groups and Indian tribes... formed the Zuni Salt Lake Coalition... to fight a utility company's plan to strip mine coal in Western New Mexico... Tribal members say the 18,000 acre area is sacred, especially the Zuni Salt Lake, where salt is extracted for religious ceremonies."

Native American Naming Ceremony in Michigan

October 28, 2001

Source: St. Petersburg Times

On October 28, 2001, The St. Petersburg Times featured an article on "a sacred Indian naming ceremony in Michigan. Medicine man C.W. 'Sings Alone' Duncan, a Cherokee Indian storyteller and shaman, performed the traditional ceremony. Although Cherokee, Duncan studied the Lakota Sioux traditions and perfers to use their ceremonial ways over the Cherokee ways... The naming ceremony began when the shaman, or healer, built and then lit the ceremonial fire. The group gathered in a circle around the small ritual fire as the shaman beat...

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Native American Faces Trial for Violating Animal Protection Laws

October 23, 2001

Source: Rocky Mountain News

On October 23, 2001, the Rocky Mountain News reported that "in the eyes of his tribe, Terry Antoine is a mask dancer, a medicine man with the spiritual power to purify eagle feathers for the sacred ceremonies of his religion... To the government, he's a black-market peddler of eagle carcasses, trading and selling them in violation of federal laws aimed at protecting a threatened species. Antoine, a 47-year-old member of the Cowichan band of the Salish tribe in Duncan, British Columbia, faces trial today in U.S. District Court...

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Ruling Clears Way for Mining on Sacred Land

October 21, 2001

Source: The New York Times

On October 21, 2001, The New York Times reported that "the Bush administration... reversed an 11th-hour Clinton administration ruling on mining policy, making it easier for companies to mine for gold, copper, zinc and lead on public lands. It also issued a legal opinion that could clear the way for a Nevada company to dig an open-pit gold mine in a part of the California desert considered sacred by a local Indian tribe."

Endangered Toad Causes Problems for California Tribe

September 23, 2001

Source: The San Diego Union-Tribune

On September 23, 2001, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported that plans for a $125 million casino and hotel complex on the Rincon Reservation in California have been hindered by the arroyo toad, which is protected under the federal Endangered Species Act. "'The Fish and Wildlife Service wanted us to create a toad paradise,' said John Currier, chairman of the Rincon tribe. 'They made us do all kinds of changes to our project. And we have to pay for it'... Although the casino project is moving ahead, the tribe is so upset...

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Military Makes Peace with the Wampanoags

August 31, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On Friday August 31, 2001, The Boston Globe reported that "Wampanoag Indian leaders, whose people have called Cape Cod home for more than 10,000 years...signed an agreement with the Massachusetts National Guard requiring the military to consult with the tribe about the handling of human remains and artifacts found on the 22,000-acre Massachusetts Military Reservation." The president of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe noted that "'in the past, the relationship between the tribes and the military has been tenuous at best'" but this "...

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Preserving Tunica-Biloxi Language and Culture

August 26, 2001

Source: The Times-Picayune

On August 26, 2001, The Times-Picayune featured an article on Donna Madere Pierite of New Orleans, a teacher and advocate of preserving Native American languages and culture. "She teaches French and Spanish at Abramson High School and also finds time to be the language program coordinator for the Tunica-Biloxi, working to keep the tribe's speech, songs, stories and culture alive... 'When I go to schools and do this little presentation, an adult will come up to me afterward with tears in their eyes,' she said. 'They said, 'I too...

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Tribes Win out over Farmers in Oregon Irrigation Dispute

August 22, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On August 22, 2001, The Boston Globe reported that "a convoy of semis and pickup trucks rumbled into [Klamath Falls, Ore.]...to protest the shut-off of federal irrigation water to farmers...Based on federal biologists' reports on the needs of endangered suckers in Upper Klamath Lake and threatened coho salmon in the Klamath River, the US Bureau of Reclamation shut off irrigation to 90 percent of the 220,000 acres of the Klamath Project [a federal irrigation system]. The action marked the first time in nearly a century that...

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Hindu Group Tries to Build Ties with Native Americans

August 20, 2001

Source: The Newspaper Today

http://www.thenewspapertoday.com/india/inside.phtml?NEWS_ID=24926

On August 20, 2001, The Newspaper Today reported that "the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh is making serious efforts to forge close links with native American Indian groups, saying the two have 'many things in common,'" Sangh spokesman M.G. Vaidya said. "Both inherit the glory and wisdom of ancient traditions and respect mother earth and we all should work together to...

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