Judaism

Religious Leaders Ask Congregations to Pool Tax Refunds

July 14, 2001

Source: The Washington Post

On July 14, 2001, The Washington Post reported that "at the annual meeting of the Baltimore-Washington Conference of the United Methodist Church...the finance chairman of [the] congregation...called on the area's 200,000 United Methodists to donate" to their churches the "advance payment'" check they will receive as part of the $ 1.35 trillion tax cut President Bush has just signed into law. "The Union of American Hebrew Congregations, which represents 1.5 million Reform Jews, also sees the potential of pooling rebates for...

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$2.5 Million Awarded to Man Fired for Not Working on Sabbath

July 11, 2001

Source: The Denver Post

On July 11, 2001, The Denver Post reported that "a former Pueblo air-traffic controller...has sued his former employer in U.S. District Court for allegedly harassing and then firing him because he refused to work on the Sabbath."

Arizona Faith Groups Respond to White Supremacist

July 6, 2001

Source: The Arizona Republic

On July 6, 2001, The Arizona Republic reported that "Arizona's diverse faith community will kick off an anti-hate campaign...in response to a White-power leader's plans to recruit here for the White Aryan Resistance...Congregations will begin a 'Not in Our State' campaign, coordinated by...the National Conference for Community and Justice. The American Jewish Committee, the Anti-Defamation League, the Arizona Catholic Conference and numerous churches have signed on with the campaign ."

Churches and Synagogues Building More Schools

July 2, 2001

Source: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

On July 2, 2001, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported that, "fueled by shifting populations, expanding or consolidating churches, a growing unease with public education, school choice vouchers and the wealth created by the recent economic expansion, churches and synagogues [across southeastern Wisconsin and the nation] are pouring millions" into construction of their own schools... According to the U.S. Census Bureau, faith-based primary and secondary school construction rose 234%, from $728 million in 1993 to $2.4...

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Temple Challenges City's Land-Use Ruling

July 1, 2001

Source: The Daily News of Los Angeles

On July 1, 2001, The Daily News of Los Angeles reported that "the City Council's denial last week of a day-care center and religious school at a long-established...synagogue" may have opened up a new battle. "Leaders of Temple Emanu El said they were considering taking legal action under a new federal law that protects religious institutions from some local land-use regulations."

Product of Muslim/Jewish Book Proposal Angers Some Muslims

July 1, 2001

Source: The Washington Post

On July 1, 2001, The Washington Post reported on the American Jewish Committee's 'Children of Abraham' project, which involved "publishing a book on Islam for Jewish readers and a book on Judaism for Muslims, then marketing them as a package to promote understanding between the two faiths...But [the] project is generating more interfaith arrows than embraces, as some Muslims have assailed portions of the guide to Islam and criticized the committee's choice of author...The author has gone into hiding under heavy security...

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Baptist Group Calls for Respect of Judaism

June 30, 2001

Source: The Houston Chronicle

On June 30, 2001, The Houston Chronicle reported that "in a panel discussion with a an Orthodox rabbi, a prominent member of an organization of moderate Baptists suggested that the singling out of Jews [for evangelism by Baptists] be renounced." The Cooperative Baptist Fellowship is "an association of 1,800 congregations, [that] started...as moderate Baptists began separating from the increasingly conservative...convention."

Weddings in Many Faiths Share Similarities

June 30, 2001

Source: The Houston Chronicle

On June 30, 2001, The Houston Chronicle reported that "June...is the time when brides and grooms fill churches, synagogues, mosques, temples and banquet halls with promises of love, fidelity and care. Traditions vary...But most couples taking a leap into married life begin by professing love and faithfulness until death parts them, if not for eternity. And even those who profess no religion often look beyond themselves on their wedding day to seal their commitment. 'People intuitively understand that [it] is something sacred...

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Reform Jews Planning to Return to Traditional Conversion Rituals

June 28, 2001

Source: The New York Times

On June 28, 2001, The New York Times reported that "Reform rabbis voted...to adopt new guidelines on conversion, a decision that reflected in part how interest in traditional rituals within Judaism's largest liberal branch, the Reform movement, has been growing...We're leaning toward tradition when it comes to ritual and personal practices,'" explained one rabbi. "'But we're still very liberal when it comes to human rights, civil rights and equality of all people.'"

Methodist Chooses Conversion to Judaism

June 28, 2001

Source: The Morning Call

On June 28, 2001, The Morning Call reported on Albert Poe, who "was born into a Methodist family 41 years ago but stopped going to church in his late teens...He began discussing religion with Jewish buddies, and something felt right to him about a faith that he saw as 'a way of life.'...To convert, [he] took six months of classes, learning basic Hebrew, a brief history of Judaism and the basis for Jewish holidays."

Religious Leaders Demand Educational Reform in Pennsylvania

June 28, 2001

Source: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

On June 28, 2001, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported that "Protestant pastors and a Jewish rabbi gathered at the state Capitol...to demand change in a school funding system they view as unjust, immoral and outrageous. They promised to organize their congregations and communities into a grass-roots campaign to 'target' lawmakers in the next election...They lamented the disparity between rich and poor school districts."

School Board Considers Changes to Religion Policy

June 27, 2001

Source: The Seattle Times

On June 27, 2001, The Seattle Times reported that "students would be permitted to say nondisruptive prayers in the classroom, and Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny could be part of holiday displays in school hallways, under proposed policy changes that will be presented tonight to the Kent School Board. The changes would replace strict guidelines the district put into effect last fall," that drew objections from students, parents and others.

Reform Jews Planning to Return to Traditional Conversion Rituals

June 27, 2001

Source: Star Tribune

On June 27, 2001, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported that "rabbis in Judaism's Reform movement are expected to approve new guidelines...for conversion to Judaism that formally recommend a return to traditional rituals such as circumcision and ritual baths...The recommendations...reflect a renewed interest in traditional Jewish practice among what has long been considered the most theologically progressive branch."

Selectmen Vote to Allow Display of Menorah

June 27, 2001

Source: Worcester Telegram & Gazette

On June 27, 2001, the Worcester Telegram & Gazette reported that "the [Westboro, Massachusetts] Board of Selectmen...approved a menorah display for the downtown rotary in December, reversing its earlier position on the issue...Selectmen worried that allowing a menorah display would open it to any number of unwanted displays...Westboro Town Counsel Alan F. Dodd said in a report to selectmen last night that the town cannot forbid the free exchange of ideas at the rotary."

Reform Rabbis Change Conversion Rules

June 27, 2001

Source: The San Francisco Chronicle

On June 27, 2001, The San Francisco Chronicle reported that "the nation's Reform rabbis are expected to make major changes in conversion guidelines today by embracing, for the first time in 100 years, traditional rituals such as circumcision long required by the other two branches of Judaism."

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