Judaism

Multifaith, Interfaith Responses to Terrorist Attacks (September)

September 19, 2001

Source: The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

On September 19, 2001, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported that "Christian, Muslim and Jewish clergy will lead a prayer service tomorrow at noon in Market Square to mourn those killed in the terrorist acts of Sept. 11 and to pray for survivors, rescuers and world peace." The article noted that, "The clergy of Pittsburgh want to give the entire community an opportunity to gather, mourn and move toward healing and reconciliation."

Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur in a Changed America

September 18, 2001

Source: The Baltimore Sun

On September 18, 2001, The Baltimore Sun reported that "'God Bless America' replaced a traditional Hebrew hymn, and the entire congregation joined in a mourner's prayer last night at Baltimore's Har Sinai temple as Rosh Hashana services marked the Jewish New Year and the start of the faith's 10-day High Holy Days period...Across the area, rabbis have said they would weave the themes of the holiday -- reconciliation and accountability, prayer, righteousness and justice -- with the national experience of the last week that has cast a...

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Americans of All Faiths Seek Solace, Understanding After Terror Attacks

September 17, 2001

Source: The Washington Post

On September 17, 2001, The Washington Post reported that "On the first Sunday after last week's devastating terrorist attacks, preachers told standing room-only crowds that God had no hand in the nation's horrendous loss. Their sermons stressed that punishment -- not revenge -- is appropriate, and many cautioned against making any ethnic or religious group the scapegoat. 'We must remember that evil does not wear a turban, a tunic, a yarmulke or a cross. Evil wears the garment of a human heart, a garment woven from the threads of...

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Editorials Regarding the Backlash, Scapegoating: Immediate Responses (Sept 13-16)

September 16, 2001

Source: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution

On September 16, 2001, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution published a series of letters to the editor under the heading "Americans Express Unity." One letter stated: "We Christians and Jews have more in common with our Muslim brothers and sisters than we have differences. I pray that we remember we are believers in the same God and are all children of Abraham. As we hear of more news reports of the possible involvement of radical Islamic terrorists, please remember that these are in the minority. Pray for all...

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Increasing Diversity in Portland, Maine

September 14, 2001

Source: The New York Times

On September 14, 2001, The New York Times reported on the vigils and interfaith services being held in cities across the United States. At Boston's vigil, "Thousands of people waved the American flag today, sang 'America The Beautiful' and listened to words of peace and tolerance at a vigil for victims of the terrorist attacks. 'What we must fear most is not evil, it is becoming evil ourselves,' said Rabbi Barry Starr of Temple Israel in Sharon, Mass., and one of the Jewish, Muslim and Christian clerics leading the...

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Multifaith, Interfaith Responses to Terrorist Attacks (September)

September 13, 2001

Source: The Christian Science Monitor

On September 13, 2001, The Christian Science Monitor reported on the acts of goodness that have followed the terrorist attacks. "From the terror comes humanity. Thousands of New Yorkers line up to give blood. A Presbyterian church hands out cups of cold water to parched walkers stranded in the city. Medical students volunteer their services at hospitals. The largest Jewish temple in New York asks a Christian minister and a Muslim holy man to participate in Rosh Hashana, part of the Jewish High Holidays, to show that...

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National Day of Prayer and Remembrance

September 13, 2001

Source: Reuters

September 13, 2001, Reuters. Ari Fleischer, White House spokesman, announced that President Bush had declared Friday, September 14 as a day of prayer and remembrance. "Fleischer said Bush planned to attend a prayer service in Washington Friday and to urge U.S. citizens to take time out of their day to attend services at churches, synagogues and mosques 'to pray for our nation, to pray for the families of those who were victimized by this act of terrorism.'"

Editorials Regarding the Backlash, Scapegoating: Immediate Responses (Sept 13-16)

September 13, 2001

Source: MSNBC

http://www.msnbc.com/news/628302.asp?0dm=C19QO

On September 13, 2001, MSNBC featured an opinion piece by Ira Rifkin. He noted, "Remember, New York is a polyglot. Many Arab-Americans and Muslim-Americans undoubtedly were among the tens of thousands who worked at the World Trade Center, and may have died there Tuesday. The damage done to Islam in America, and probably across the Western world, is incalculable. It appears that terrorists who hijacked the Koran to cloak...

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Religious Communities and Advocacy Organizations Issue Statements Regarding Backlash, Scapegoating

September 13, 2001

Source: Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism

http://www.rac.org//news/091301.html

On September 13, 2001, Reform Jewish leaders expressed outrage at reports of attacks against Muslim Americans and Arab Americans. In a joint statement from the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism and the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, Rabbi Eric H. Yoffie and Rabbi David Saperstein wrote: "At times such as these—and we pray that there will no more such times—it is especially important that...

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Multifaith, Interfaith Responses to Terrorist Attacks (September)

September 13, 2001

Source: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

On September 13, 2001, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported on an interfaith service that gathered Milwaukee's diverse religious communities, "Drawn by a common quest for healing, justice and peace..." Speakers included "mainline Christians, Jews, Muslims, a Sikh, a Buddhist, a Baha'i, a Hindu and a Quaker." The article quoted religious leaders in their prayers of peace and unity, including Rev. Tonen O'Connor of the Milwaukee Zen Center. "'The Buddha perceived, not that we could be one, but that we are one. In our essence...

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Multifaith, Interfaith Responses to Terrorist Attacks (September)

September 13, 2001

Source: The San Francisco Chronicle

On September 13, 2001, The San Francisco Chronicle reported on Interfaith events in the Bay Area in which people of "a wide range of traditions called for a large outdoor interfaith memorial service where residents could mourn for the victims as well as meditate on the impact of racism." The article quoted Charles Gibbs of the United Religions Initiative: "'We need to draw distinctions between people who are dedicated to violence regardless of religion and people who are dedicated to peace regardless of their religion.'"...

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Religious Communities and Advocacy Organizations Issue Statements Regarding Backlash, Scapegoating

September 13, 2001

Source: American Jewish Committee

http://www.ajc.org/press/default.htm?show.asp?ID=255

On September 13, 2001, The American Jewish Committee issued the following statement: "The catastrophic terror inflicted on American soil must not become an occasion for stereotyping or scapegoating. Jewish history makes us painfully aware that, too often, times of crisis provide opportunities for expressions of bigotry. An entire people or religion should never be implicated because of the...

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Increased Security in Response to Muslim Fears of Backlash

September 12, 2001

Source: Los Angeles Times

On September 12, 2001, The Los Angeles Times reported that, "From Washington to Los Angeles, Muslim leaders quickly mobilized to put out the word that they stood united with other Americans. At the same time, Muslim parochial schools were being closed, Islamic centers and mosques were being shuttered, and Muslim workers were staying off the job out of fear that they would be targeted amid an upturn in e-mail and telephone threats." Mosques and Islamic Schools throughout Southern California will increase security in response to a...

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In the U.S.: Muslims, Sikhs, Arabs, South Asians Face Threats, Violence - Immediate Backlash

September 12, 2001

Source: The New York Times

On September 12, 2001, The New York Times reported on the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on America. "In the face of suspicion and discrimination, Muslims struggled to assert their identities as loyal American citizens and to say that their religion does not approve of violence against innocents. Jews, meanwhile, could not help linking the victimization of Americans to that of Jews in Israel." The article continued, "...Muslim and Arab leaders in the New York area emphasized that they were reacting to the emergency first and...

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