Judaism

Americans Turn to Religion

October 4, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On October 4, 2001, The Boton Globe reported that "people of many religions have turned to faith to help cope with the pain of Sept. 11. In the weeks since the terrorist attacks on the United States, attendance at churches, synagogues and mosques south of Boston has swelled."

Increase in Hate Crimes in Metro Washington, DC

October 3, 2001

Source: The Washington Post

On October 3, 2001, The Washington Post reported that incidents suspected as hate crimes "have increased around the region since Sept. 11, with most victims being Arab Americans, Muslims, Sikhs and people who look Middle Eastern. More than 20 such incidents have been reported in Fairfax County ...Montgomery County has had 12 reported hate crimes...Police said they suspect that many incidents are not being reported, [they] have increased patrols at all of the county's mosques and Islamic schools...A few of the recently reported...

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Supreme Court Declines to Consider Religious Discrimination and Racial Profiling Cases

October 2, 2001

Source: The Arizona Republic

On October 2, 2001, The Arizona Republic reported that "a Muslim woman will not be allowed to pursue claims that her boss violated her rights by pressuring her to stop wearing a head scarf to work." Zenib Ali said she "was told in 1996 to stop wearing the scarf at work or she would be transferred to a position with less customer interaction...She said her religion requires her head to be covered in the presence of men who are not family members...The Supreme Court declined on Monday to consider reinstating Zeinab Ali's lawsuit...

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Multifaith, Interfaith Responses to Terrorist Attacks (October)

October 1, 2001

Source: Newsday

On October 1, 2001, Newsday reported that "Hundreds of Queens residents gathered...for a solemn and, at times, spirited multifaith service honoring World Trade Center victims. Reflecting the borough's diversity, representatives of virtually every major global religion delivered remarks, including Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Muslim, Sikh and Buddhist."

Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur in a Changed America

September 26, 2001

Source: Newsday

On September 26, 2001, Newsday reported, "Post-Disaster, Yom Kippur Has Special Significance." The article explained, "The holy day, which starts at sundown today and ends tomorrow evening, is also a time to renew one's commitment to working for justice, serving one's community and performing good works, spiritual leaders said. 'We're reminded to recognize truly right from wrong, to recognize the importance of pursuing justice, and the importance of not simply worrying about the self but worrying and taking care of each other, of our...

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After the Terror, Legal Issue for Orthodox Jews

September 25, 2001

Source: Daily News

On September 25, 2001, The Daily News reported, "Proof of death legal issue for Orthodox Jews." The article notes, "Identifying the bodies of loved ones lost in the World Trade Center disaster is a legal, not just an emotional, issue for Orthodox Jews. According to Judaic law, evidence of death or a witness to the death is required before the seven-day mourning period known as shiva can begin."

Islamic Scholars Condemn Terror Attacks and Speak Out about Islam

September 19, 2001

Source: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution

On September 19, 2001, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reported on the common roots of Islam, Judaism, and Christianity and aimed to dispel some misunderstandings about Islam. "'People tend to think of what's happening now --- the Taliban and bin Laden --- in terms that are purely religious,' said John Iskander, assistant professor in religious studies at Georgia State University. 'They de-politicize what's happening and focus entirely on Islam. They ask, Is Islam a violent religion?...The answer is yes and...

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Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur in a Changed America

September 19, 2001

Source: St. Louis Post-Dispatch

On September 19, 2001, The St. Louis Post Dispatch reported on local Rosh Hashana services: "Early in his sermon, Rabbi Mark Shook asked the congregation to turn and hug family members and strangers nearby as a way of healing from the pain of the previous week. 'It is as though our entire nation is sitting shivah,' he said referring to the Jewish practice of gathering at the home of mourners for seven days after burial to pray. 'All of us are mourners.'... Only God can comfort Americans in their loss, because no one else...

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Multifaith, Interfaith Responses to Terrorist Attacks (September)

September 19, 2001

Source: The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

On September 19, 2001, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported that "Christian, Muslim and Jewish clergy will lead a prayer service tomorrow at noon in Market Square to mourn those killed in the terrorist acts of Sept. 11 and to pray for survivors, rescuers and world peace." The article noted that, "The clergy of Pittsburgh want to give the entire community an opportunity to gather, mourn and move toward healing and reconciliation."

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