Interfaith

New Jersey Has Become Magnet for Immigrants

March 10, 2001

Source: The New York Times

On March 10, 2001, The New York Times reported that "among the most vivid threads in the New Jersey census figures are stark figures on the diversification of the suburbs around the state and particularly here in the boom belt across the narrow middle of the state, where new names and faces from abroad have moved [in]...The blizzard of numbers from the census tell of a new kind of immigrant, the educated, high-achieving striver who...puts down roots here in Middlesex County, within commuting distance of the electronics,...

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World Religions Class Fosters Tolerance and Understanding

March 10, 2001

Source: St. Petersburg Times

http://www.sptimes.com/News/031001/NorthPinellas/Teacher_broadens_worl.shtml

On March 10, 2001, the St. Petersburg Times reported on a world religions class taught by Timothy "Coach" Falls at at Palm Harbor University High School in Florida. He decided to teach the course after he found that the students in a social studies class he was teaching "had a deep well of ignorance and prejudice for different cultures...

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Muslim Leaders Condemn Taliban's Destruction of Buddhist Statues

March 9, 2001

Source: Los Angeles Times

On March 9, 2001, the Los Angeles Times reported that "leading Southern California Muslim scholars...denounced the ruling Taliban's destruction of Buddhist statues in Afghanistan as contrary to their faith's laws and traditions...The Los Angeles meeting...reflected growing efforts by a network of Muslim intellectuals and human rights advocates...to challenge, on the basis of Islamic law, oppression that they believe is being falsely imposed in the name of Islam...In a unanimous statement, eight intellectuals said the Taliban's...

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Lawyer Challenges Use of Secret Evidence to Fight Terrorism

March 9, 2001

Source: The Boston Globe

On March 9, 2001, The Boston Globe reported on civil-rights lawyer Juliette Kayyem, who is executive director of a project on counterterrorism and domestic preparedness at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. She is waging what seems "like a one-woman war within the Justice Department against the use of secret evidence... Acting on secret evidence, US officials now seize, detain, and deport foreigners suspected of terrorist activities." The National Commission on Terrorism, the congressionally appointed panel she sits on, "...

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Census 2000 Uses Multiracial Categories, Tracks Growing Diversity

March 8, 2001

Source: USA TODAY

On March 8, 2001, USA TODAY reported that "the first detailed Census 2000 numbers show...Hispanics [are at] the point of becoming the nation's largest minority group...The 2000 Census shows that the number of Hispanics grew almost 60% since 1990, to 35.3 million." A demographer with the Milken Institute in Santa Monica, Calif. calls this "an important shift in American race relations."

Bush Administration Responds to Criticism of Initiative from Christian Right

March 8, 2001

Source: The Washington Post

On March 8, 2001, The Washington Post reported that John DiIulio "lashed out at critics on the religious right who oppose President Bush's plan to provide government funds to religious charities, deepening a rare rift between the new administration and once-loyal social conservatives...Many religious conservatives have criticized the Bush 'faith-based initiative' because they believe government interference would compromise churches' spirituality."

Muslims Seek Apology from Rev. Falwell for Bigotry

March 8, 2001

Source: The Arizona Republic

On March 8, 2001, The Arizona Republic reported on the Rev. Jerry Falwell's remark that "the Moslem faith teaches hate" and should be barred from Bush's faith-based initiatives. "Falwell later told USA Today that he meant any group that is anti-Semitic, racist or in any way bigoted should be disqualified...Islamic, Christian and Jewish leaders, even a spokesman for Middle East terrorist group Hezbollah, denounced Falwell's remarks."

Organization Creates Friendships that Cross Different Religions

March 7, 2001

Source: The Kansas City Star

On March 7, 2001, The Kansas City Star reported on the founder of HateBusters, an organization that arranged the first of a monthly series of visits by Christians to the houses of worship of three other major religions in Kansas City, the Hindu Temple, Beth Shalom Synagogue and the Islamic Center." The purpose of the trips, said the founder, is to ask, "How are we all as people of faith like each other, and how can we become neighbors?"

New York City Tries to Accommodate All Faiths with Special-Interest Legislation

March 6, 2001

Source: The New York Times

On March 6, 2001, The New York Times reported that "the New York political theory [is] that the way to honor the dignity of faith is by passing special-interest legislation for every religion in sight." This began when the New York City government began "celebrating Id al-Adha, the Islamic Feast of Sacrifice, by suspending alternate-side street parking rules." After the city's recognition of this holiday other religious groups began demanding special legislation as well.

Op-Ed Articles Respond to Bush's Faith-Based Initiative

March 5, 2001

Source: Star Tribune

On March 5, 2001, the Minneapolis Star Tribune published an editorial by Donald E. Miller, in which he criticized Bush's faith-based initiatives for making religion nothing more than an extension of government. This is a problem because "one of the essential roles of the church, temple or synagogue is not just to serve the poor but to work toward eliminating the structural forces that create poverty...It is also the task of religion to be a judge and critic." The initiative, he said, would create generic forms of civil religion. Plus,...

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Census 2000 Uses Multiracial Categories, Tracks Growing Diversity

March 5, 2001

Source: Los Angeles Times

On March 5, 2001, the Los Angeles Times reported that Census 2000 "is the first in which Americans were invited to mark one or more races, creating a total of 57 new categories with anywhere from two to six races... The census' formalizing of multiple-race answers...explodes the most basic notion of race: that there are discrete bio-cultural groups of human beings," and reflects four decades of "vast demographic shifts." Multiracial data will, among other things, complicate statisticians' calculations, the issue of voting...

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Lutheran-Funded Charity Example of Bush's Vision of Faith-Based Charities

March 4, 2001

Source: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution

On March 4, 2001, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reported on the Community Family Life Services center, sponsored by First Trinity Lutheran Church in Washington, D.C. As a typical faith-based charity, the center offers insights into [Bush's] contention "that faith-based groups are more innovative, nimble and successful than government in meeting the needs of people living in poverty... It also provides reassurance about...fears that faith-based groups might try to convert people seeking assistance, or...

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Century of Racial and Ethnic Categorizations in America

March 4, 2001

Source: The Arizona Republic

On March 4, 2001, The Arizona Republic reported on the categories that have been used on census forms in the past century as America struggled to describe its ethnic and racial diversity. Among the categories that have been used is the "Hindu race."

Islamic Leaders Denounce Taliban's Destruction of Non-Islamic Art

March 3, 2001

Source: Los Angeles Times

On March 3, 2001, the Los Angeles Times reported that the Taliban has ordered the "ruination of every non-Islamic religious piece of art in the country... Islamic leaders in the U.S. and other countries, including Iran and Pakistan, called on the Taliban to grant a reprieve." Muzammil H. Siddiqi, director of the Islamic Society of Orange County, said the demolition of the art is "'a very un-Islamic act.' Salam Al-Marayati, director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council, a national organization based in Los Angeles, agreed."

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