Other Indigenous Traditions

Alaska Tlingits hold memorial ceremony online amid pandemic

November 10, 2020

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — When a Tlingit elder dies, leaders from the Alaska Native tribe’s two houses, the Raven and Eagle clans, typically come together along with family and well-wishers for a memorial ceremony featuring displays of traditional tribal regalia.

After elder, tribal leader and college professor David Katzeek died last month, the tribe scrambled to find a way to observe their sacred traditions while keeping everyone safe during the pandemic, with coronavirus cases surging in the state.

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Magic, Witchcraft and Curanderismo: Let's talk about cultural appropriation

September 18, 2020

For some years now, cultural appropriation has been installed in our modern society to judge the practices of some individuals who extract elements of a culture or tradition that doesn't belong to them and use it for their own benefit. Sometimes the accusation is confusing, especially considering that no culture is pure — not even our DNA is pure — and especially in a global world. 

However, appropriation can also be seen as an act of violence, especially when its legitimate bearers are made invisible or muzzled and the privilege, which takes...

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The pandemic hasn’t stopped Native Hawaiians’ fight to protect Maunakea

August 7, 2020

“It almost seems like it never happened,” Pua Case tells Vox about her time in the encampment at the foot of Maunakea, a dormant volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii and the tallest mountain in the world. While she lives only a 30-minute drive away, she says, “I have to go back and look at videos or pictures to remind myself that we were really up there.”

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How Taiwanese death rituals have adapted for families living in the US

July 23, 2020

Taiwanese people living in the United States face a dilemma when loved ones die. Many families worry that they might not be able to carry out proper rituals in their new homeland.

As a biracial Taiwanese-American archaeologist living in Idaho and studying in Taiwan, I am discovering the many faces of Taiwan’s blended cultural heritage drawn from the mix of peoples that...

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Alaska Natives call for justice in solidarity with #BlackLivesMatter

June 8, 2020

 

Across the country and around the world, people are calling for justice following the death of George Floyd in Minnesota and the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, in Georgia, and Breonna Taylor, in Kentucky. Floyd died after being pinned to the ground by a white police officer for almost nine minutes. Two white men were arrested and charged with Arbery's death. A third man filmed them chasing him through the streets of a South Georgia community. He was later shot. Plainclothes police officers shot Taylor in her apartment while serving a "no-knock" warrant. 

For...

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How COVID-19 and the fight against Big Oil is reviving one Alaskan people's spiritual traditions

June 1, 2020

 

Arriving home on one of the last regular flights before pandemic restrictions went into effect in mid-February, Sarah James got to her house to find two caribous worth of meat in her freezer.

Since flights have become intermittent to this indigenous village 100 miles north of the Arctic Circle, said James, a leader of the Gwich’in Athabascan people, the store periodically runs out of basics like meat and sugar. Subsistence hunting, fishing and gathering have been more critical than ever.

To ensure that Arctic Village's population of fewer than 200...

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'Braiding the sacred': Land Institute studies relationship between people, plants - News - The Kansan - Newton, KS - Newton, KS

August 12, 2019
A ritual in May in a field near Salina changed Abbi Han's life.Han had never been a caretaker for plants. Now, the research resident at the Land Institute is responsible for the survival of a diverse smattering of crops with traditions steeped in American Indian culture.Every day, Han checks on the plants she sowed in May, watering them from a well as needed and pollinating by hand to avoid cross-breeding from an industrial corn operation across the road.Following the advice of Taylor Keen,

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 North American Indigenous chafe at restrictions along U.S.-Canada border

April 29, 2019
As plans for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border are raising fears that the ancestral lands of Native Americans in the south will be divided, indigenous people in the north are calling attention to their own border problems.The United States and Canada share the largest undefended border in the world, but free passage across it for indigenous tribes is easier in one direction than the other, tribal leaders and immigration lawyers said at the Arctic Encounter Symposium this week.A tribal member born in Canada can come to the United States to work or live without the paperwork...
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