Sri Nijanand Foundation International

This profile was last updated in 2002

Affiliation

Main affiliation is with the Nijanand Ashram Trust, which has two ashrams, the main one in Ratan Puri, UP, and a second one in Vadoadara, Gujarat. There is a temple located in Panna, Madya Pradesh, in the geographical center of India, which represents the theological resting place of all self-realized souls who will join God’s ultimate heaven (Mul Milava) at a future apocalyptic end time. The selection of this site for the temple was based on an ancient Puranic story of Shiva revealing to Parvati where in the Kali Yuga the final decisive incarnation of divine wisdom would be revealed.

Activities and Schedule

The schedule at Narendra Patel’s home shrine in Clifton is Fridays, from 8:30 P.M. to 10:30 P.M., and Sundays, 10:30 A.M. to 11:30 A.M. Each ceremony consists of a standard invocation and opening prayer, followed by the singing of kirtans (songs) selected from the group’s holy book, the Holy Kuljam Swaroop Saheb, followed by a reading from the book and preaching, and concluding with the “arji,” a final prayer that focuses on “Mul Milava,” the final resting place in God’s ultimate abode where all souls find their true being and existence.

History

The first family of Nijanandis in NJ was that of Mahesh Shah, who came to the US 25 years ago. Narendra Patel, who had received Nijanand initiation in 1981, came to the US in 1989. He organized the first meeting in 1990. The group’s guru, Jadgish Chandra came in 1992, traveling over 5000 miles to several major cities in the eastern and central US. Chandra came again in 1994, including Canada in his travels. Since 1995, the group has focused much energy on translating their literature into different Indian languages and English. The group also performs service projects, such as relief for Indian earthquake victims. The next goal of the group is the construction of a center, either in NJ, GA, or TN.Description: In Narendra’s house shrine, which is in his house’s den, there is a large box in which the ceremonial copy of the Holy Kuljam Swaroop, is placed on a pillow and covered with a green silk blanket. This copy doesn’t move because there is no one to care for it in the proper ritual manner. Narendra and the group that meets in his house use another copy of the book that sits on a reading stand on the floor and is covered with another silk cloth.

Description

In Narendra’s house shrine, which is in his house’s den, there is a large box in which the ceremonial copy of the Holy Kuljam Swaroop, is placed on a pillow and covered with a green silk blanket. This copy does not move because there is no one to care for it in the proper ritual manner. Narendra and the group that meets in his house use another copy of the book that sits on a reading stand on the floor and is covered with another silk cloth.