Witchcraft in the United States

Source: The Times-Picayune

On October 31, 1999, The Times-Picayune published an
article on the growth of Wicca in the United States.


Witchcraft in the United States

Source: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution

On October 30, 1999, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution
published an article on the Atlanta Pagan community and the
national Pagan ecumenism that resulted from the criticisms of U.S.
Rep. Bob Barr (R-Georgia.). Despite the efforts by Barr to ban
witchcraft from military bases, Pagans united to counter his efforts.
One result of this unity is the Wiccan Pagan Educational Association,
an Atlanta-based group that watches legislation that could have an
impact on Pagan worship. Ginger Wages of Atlanta operates Magickal
Cauldron, CQ, a Web site and newsletter dedicated to disseminating
information about court cases, legislative efforts, and media
depictions of Wiccans and Pagans. Wages commented on the efforts of
the Georgia Representative: “Bob Barr created a lot of good press for
us, as far as getting people away from the misconception that we’re
Satanists…He did more for us than we ever thought about doing.”
Ravenwood Church, the first public Wiccan church in Atlanta, is about
to buy its first congregational property in DeKalb County, GA after
almost 25 years of existence. In addition, DeKalb County’s Lady
Galadriel has just begun her term as first officer of the Covenant of
the Goddess, a 24-year-old international organization of over 200
witches’ covens.


Witchcraft in the United States

Source: The San Francisco Chronicle

On October 29, 1999, The San Francisco Chronicle
published an article on the Wiccan community of Contra Costa County
in California.