South Asian Solidarity After September 11

Source: The New Republic

http://www.thenewrepublic.com/122401/diarist122401.html

The December 24, 2001 edition of The New Repbulic features the article “All for One.” The article details the “post-September 11 paradox” of “South Asian” identity. It continues, “While the war on terrorism has inflamed religious and national divisions on the subcontinent … in the United States it has probably done more to unify America’s disparate South Asian communities than any event since the mass migration that brought them to these shores in large numbers three decades ago. Since 9/11, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Nepalis, Sri Lankans, and Indians have felt the sting of hundreds of hate crimes and thousands of ugly comments. Describing this backlash, the media has increasingly used the label ‘South Asian,’ providing the term a legitimacy it hadn’t enjoyed before. … Because, to American bigots, Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis, Muslims, Hindus, and Sikhs all look the same–brown–many victims are deciding they have a lot more in common than they had previously realized.”


South Asian Solidarity After September 11

Source: www.satyacircle.com

http://www.satyacircle.com/rathod3.html

On December 19, 2001, Satyacircle.com published another view on South Asian solidarity in the editorial “E Pluribus Unum: Out of Many, One.” It noted, “While the invocation of this phrase certainly is appropriate for America as a whole, its message is particularly relevant to the South Asian-American community, which has been placed under considerable strain over the past few weeks. As increasing numbers of South Asian Americans suffer harassment, violence, and even death, our community as a whole may experience a splintering that is the product of intimidation and fear. To counter this trend, it is critical that we present a unified voice and devise a cohesive strategy in response to these discriminatory acts.” The editorial continued, “Instead of letting these incidents of post-terrorism discrimination balkanize our community along the lines of ethnic group and class, we must continue the process of education while vocalizing our disgust for all forms of ethnic discrimination.”