Ramadan and Thanksgiving

Source: USA TODAY

On November 28, 2001, the USA TODAY featured an article on community meals during Ramadan at a California Islamic center. “Serving food to friends is one way of serving God, says Safi Mosa, 29, who left Afghanistan more than 11 years ago…On weekends during Ramadan, he closes the shop early and heads to the Islamic Center in Hawthorne, Calif., where he and his sisters volunteer to help prepare food for 300. ‘I love to serve people,’ Mosa says, as a way of ‘helping in the name of God.'”


Ramadan and Thanksgiving

Source: The New York Times

On November 23, 2001, The New York Times featured a story on the Bashir family who, in observance of Ramadan “waited until sunset… [before] they gathered around the dining room table with other relatives, Muslim, Christian and Jewish, offering thanks in their suburban Chicago home… While some Muslim Americans believe that Thanksgiving conflicts with their religion, many, like the Bashirs, observe the holiday, saying that, of all the American holidays, Thanksgiving is most in harmony with the teachings of Islam.”


Ramadan and Thanksgiving

Source: The Kansas City Star

On November 23, 2001, The Kansas City Star reported that “this year, Thanksgiving fell during the month of Ramadan, when Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset. So [in Kansas City] the Papa family, of the Islamic faith, broke their fast with a traditional holiday meal. But across town, Mustafa Hussein will have nothing to do with Thanksgiving. The holiday has Christianity as its root, he says, and to celebrate it is to betray his own Islamic heritage.” The article also reported that although most Muslims in the area usually celebrate Thanksgiving, many were cutting back on their festivities this year due to the timing of Ramadan.


Ramadan and Thanksgiving

Source: The Washington Post

On November 22, 2001, The Washington Post reported that “the similarity between the Southern Maryland Islamic Center’s Interfaith Ramadan Thanksgiving Dinner and the original event that inspired it did not go unmentioned by one event host” who said “‘the first Thanksgiving was a way for two cultures to join and to share food with families and to give thanks for all the blessings of friendship… Things have not changed so much that this cannot be done today as well’…Many local religious leaders said they felt it was important to attend the event.”