Religious Diversity News

Showing all news articles.

Kosovo Coverage

Source: The Houston Chronicle

On April 11, 1999, The Houston Chronicle reported that
members of the Islamic Society of Greater Houston and other area
mosques congregated in downtown Houston on Saturday, April 10th to
protest the killing of Muslims in Kosovo and to support the bombing
effort. Syed Mustafa Kamal, regional coordinator for the Kosovo Task
Force, said that similar demonstrations were being held in 50 other
United States cities.

Sikhs Celebrate 300th Anniversary of the Khalsa

Source: The Plain Dealer

On April 10, 1999, The Plain Dealer reported that there
is a planned procession along Public Square in Cleveland on April
24th to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the Khalsa. With two
gurdwaras and an estimated 500 families in the greater Cleveland
area, the Sikh community has a growing presence in the area. Ohio
Governor Bob Taft officially designated April 14th Khalsa Sikh Day in
recognition of “the faith, rich cultural heritage and family values”
that Sikhs promote.”

Sikhs Celebrate 300th Anniversary of the Khalsa

Source: Los Angeles Times

On April 10, 1999, the Los Angeles Times published an
article on Sikhism to mark the 300th anniversary of the Khalsa. On
Sunday, April 4th, “more than 10,000 Sikhs celebrated the anniversary
in a colorful procession of floats through downtown Los Angeles.”

Kosovo Coverage

Source: The Hartford Courant

On April 10, 1999, The Hartford Courant reported that
members of the Albanian American Muslim Community Mosque in
Waterbury, Connecticut are raising money to send food, clothes, and
medicine to the ethnic Albanian refugees. They are also sending their
prayers. Nick Ozkan, president of the 150-family congregation, stated
that, “prayer is making contact with the All-Powerful because He can
stop what is happening.”

Kosovo Coverage

Source: Los Angeles Times

On April 9, 1999, the Los Angeles Times published an
article about the American Jewish response to the ethnic cleansing in
Kosovo. With images from the region that resonate with 20th century
Jewish experience, the crisis in Kosovo has prompted the Jewish
community to be outspoken in condemning the violence against the
ethnic Albanians. The Anti-Defamation League has sponsored full-page
advertisements supporting the NATO bombing campaign and asking for
donations to help “innocent victims of hatred.” Jewish Federation
chapters across the United States have also run advertisements and
established relief funds.

Kosovo Coverage

Source: Sacramento Bee

On April 7, 1999, the Sacramento Bee reported that local
faith-based and secular groups are stepping up aid to the Kosovar
refugees. Muslim, Christian, and Jewish groups in the area have
provided a great deal of relief to the refugees. Jim Rodgers of the
Catholic Charities of Sacramento expressed that giving money is more
helpful than clothing or food because, “trying to transport goods is
so much more expensive.” Several organizations are collecting funds
for Kosovo: the Sacramento Area League of Associated Muslims, the
American Red Cross/Sacramento Sierra chapter, and the Council of
Jewish Federations.

First International Sikh Convention

Source: The New York Times

On April 5, 1999, The New York Times reported that the
first international Sikh convention took place in the Meadowlands
Exposition Center in Secaucus, NJ on Saturday, April 3rd as a prelude
to many of the international festivities for the 300th anniversary of
the Khalsa. With about 6,000 people in attendance, the daylong event
was “part academic convocation, part political rally, and part
performance with songs, skits, and a tae kwon do demonstration.”
Rajnarind Kaur, an analyst with J.P. Morgan, stated: “There has never
been anything like this before. To get highly distinguished speakers
all together at one time like this is amazing, and this is a once in
a lifetime chance for all these people to come together.”

Passover Coverage

Source: The New York Times

On April 2, 1999, The New York Times published an article
on the Passover celebrated in Brooklyn by the United Spiritual Church
of God, a Guyanese Christian evangelical denomination that practices
the tenets of Judaism. The United Spiritual Church, one of about 50
in the United States, conducted the Passover celebration with a
non-Jewish seder meal and dances to Caribbean and African rhythms.
Though the Passover is celebrated as the Jewish Exodus from Egypt,
the meaning of matzoh is transformed into a holy communion. Neil
Felix, a church elder, stated that, “the exodus is a change of life,
from darkness, from drinking and lying when we did not know Christ to
his deliverance…We became new creatures through the Jewish Passover
and then the crucifixion two days later. It symbolizes our moving
from one state to another.”

Tibetan Mandala Created in California by Buddhist Nuns

Source: The San Francisco Chronicle

On April 2, 1999, The San Francisco Chronicle reported
that the Buddhist nuns of Khachoe Ghakyll Nunnery in Kathmandu, Nepal
created a sand mandala at Holy Names College in Oakland. The
five-foot diameter mandala was created to represent compassion and
the recent gender breakthrough of Tibetan Buddhist nuns to create
sand mandalas and to earn the Geshe, the equivalent of a Doctor of
Divinity. To become a Geshe, a nun must study for about 25 years in
meditation and the creation of sacred art. Cheryl Gipson, organizer
of the event in Oakland, said, “The mandala itself is sacred
space…It’s creating very blessed and pure energy that will leave an
imprint on anyone’s mind that sees it or hears it. It’s a
representation of the enlightened mind.”

Kosovo Coverage

Source: Los Angeles Times

On April 2, 1999, the Los Angeles Times reported that
Orange County religious groups are sending food, clothes, medical
supplies, and prayers to the Kosovar refugees. Many of Orange
County’s Islamic centers are holding special prayer services for the
refugees and conducting “dollar campaigns” to help raise the money
necessary to ship the necessary items. Jihan Assaf, spokeswoman for
the Islamic Society of Orange County, stated: “The purpose is to have
a special prayer for all of the people in need there, as well as show
support for the allies and their efforts.”