Religious Diversity News

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Sikh Religious Society Hosted Palatine Library’s Interfaith Holy Books Discussion | SikhNet

Palatine, IL:  Sikh Religious Society Palatine Illinois partnered with the local Palatine Library to invite the library members and community at large to an Interfaith Discussion about Holy Books, hosted at the Sikh Gurudwara (Sikh place of worship) in Palatine Illinois on May 24. More than 250 guests were delighted to visit and learn more about different religious holy scriptures, as well as share in “Langar” a vegetarian meal served by the volunteers at the Gurudwara.

Speakers from Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Sikh faith were invited to explain the core messages of their scriptures in a learning environment. The presentations were moderated by Father Corey Brost, C.S.V., co-founder of The Children of Abraham Coalition.

Source: Sikh Religious Society Hosted Palatine Library’s Interfaith Holy Books Discussion | SikhNet

Sporty hijabs help Muslim girls keep up pace in athletics

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Muslim student athletes at one U.S. high school no longer have to be slowed down by worries that their headscarves might fall off.

Deering High School in Portland, Maine, is providing sport hijabs with the goal of making Muslim girls comfortable — and boosting their participation in sports. The lightweight scarves stay put and are less bulky than other hijabs, garments that cover the hair and are worn by many Muslim women to express their faith.

Source: Sporty hijabs help Muslim girls keep up pace in athletics

Can an evangelical, progressive Democrat succeed in Florida? | Religion News Service

ORLANDO, Fla. (RNS) A few days after the Pulse nightclub shootings, in which most of the 49 patrons who were killed were gay and Latino, a local businessman and active Christian layman contributed a guest column to the Orlando Sentinel titled “Christian to LGBTs: We are sorry.”

“I believe one source of hope may come from the Christian church, an institution I have loved and been a part of since I was a little boy,” wrote Chris King. “Historically, I see a church that has often gotten it wrong — really wrong — when it comes to serving the needs of the LGBTQ community.

Source: Can an evangelical, progressive Democrat succeed in Florida? | Religion News Service

Rapping for Jesus: Religious hip-hop isn’t quite what you think – News – Wicked Local – Boston, MA

Across America, a number of artists are putting the beat back in the Beatitudes.

To the average person, the idea of Christian hip-hop registers somewhere between Crocs sandals and minivans on the scale of “super lame things for white people.”

A person who has never listened to the genre might imagine it to be preachy, overly evangelizing and a little corny. As with most things, however, expectation and reality are two different things.

Source: Rapping for Jesus: Religious hip-hop isn’t quite what you think – News – Wicked Local – Boston, MA

Our Lady of the Cape Church launches “Catholics Come Home” campaign | Religion News Service

Brewster, Mass.:  Our Lady of the Cape Parish is announcing a Catholics Come Home campaign at all masses and community activities to welcome anyone who drifted away from Catholicism for any reason, back to the Church. Our Lady of the Cape Church will host a series of four informal gatherings for inactive Catholics at its parish center located at 468 Stony Brook Road in Brewster every Thursday in July at 7 p.m.  The gatherings are free and are designed to create a forum for dialogue around questions concerning matters of faith and the Catholic Church.  The pastor of Our Lady of the Cape parish, Fr. William Kaliyadan says, “We invite all non-practicing Catholics, for whatever reason, to make a U-turn, no questions asked.  Summer vacation on the Cape is a perfect time for personal reflection.  So, an invitation to come back to the Catholic Church, during this soul-searching process, makes a lot of sense.  Our church is a no-judgement zone – everyone is welcome, no pressure, no obligation.

Source: Our Lady of the Cape Church launches “Catholics Come Home” campaign | Religion News Service

Portlanders respond to killings with prayer and eclectic spirituality | Religion News Service

PORTLAND, Ore. (RNS) Beside the makeshift memorial that has sprung up outside the light-rail station where three men were stabbed on a train, Bernal Cruz knelt, holding a bunch of flowers and his toddler son.

“As I get older and as my kids get older, I feel a different impact as these things happen,” Cruz said, as he added his bouquet to the de facto secular altars that have sprung up in the form of candles, images of deities of Eastern religions and handwritten notes.

Portland may be the least religious city in the U.S. But its residents are drawing on a deep sense of personal spirituality and shared values to unite in the face of hate, for comfort in the wake of tragedy.

Source: Portlanders respond to killings with prayer and eclectic spirituality | Religion News Service

Maryland bishops call for compassion, prudence on immigration

 The Maryland Catholic Conference has issued a statement of guiding principles for Catholics and state legislators to better encounter immigrants with compassion in both personal and political arenas.

Members of the Maryland community, they said, should encounter migrants with “a spirit of compassion, prudence, and cooperation to address the challenges faced by immigrants, elected officials, law enforcement and our communities as a whole.”

The May 30 document, signed by bishops in Maryland, Washington, and Delaware, refers to immigration enforcement on local and federal levels.

Source: Maryland bishops call for compassion, prudence on immigration

Scholars Are Finally Tackling Yiddish Children’s Literature – The Forward

In the 1921 Yiddish children’s book “The Wind That Got Angry,” by Moyshe Kulbak, an “old, wandering wind” finds himself booted out of his village when a thaw sets in. He tries to find somewhere in the woods to rest. He’s tired and wants to sleep, but no one wants him around. The oak tree he settles on kicks him away, so he finds a rock to lie on. The rock calls him a tramp. He finds a cozy hotel, but the innkeeper curses after him for peeping into the doorway

Read more: http://forward.com/culture/books/332197/scholars-are-finally-tackling-yiddish-childrens-literature/

Source: Scholars Are Finally Tackling Yiddish Children’s Literature – The Forward

Idra Novey’s Award-Winning Novel’s Sephardic Influence – The Forward

A poet, translator and fiction writer, Idra Novey honors all those genres in her first novel, “Ways to Disappear.” “This novel,” she told me in a recent conversation, “is a stewing pot in which I threw in poetry and translation in the same book. I put a lid on it and turned up the heat, hoping it would cook into something.” The satisfying result has been a much acclaimed, prize-winning book, which has just won the 2017 Jewish Book Council’s Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature.

Novey, who is fluent in Portuguese and Spanish, has translated the work of Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector whom she discovered when she was a student at Barnard:

I took a class in Experimental Texts by Latin American women where I read Lispector for the first time. I felt an intense kinship with her. Her relationship to Brazil as an outsider and a Jew was something I related to. I felt similarly in western Pennsylvania. [Lispector and I] were both in places that were not easy for intense, artistic Jewish women to be.

Read more: http://forward.com/sisterhood/373838/debut-jewish-novel-has-appalachian-roots-and-sephardic-influence/

Source: Idra Novey’s Award-Winning Novel’s Sephardic Influence – The Forward