#NamaSlay, Or How Black Women Are Using Trap Yoga as a Mode of Spiritual Resistance | Religion Dispatches

As rapper Future mumbled over the speakers, I exhaled and crouched down for a very shaky approximation of a warrior pose. This was my first trap yoga class, and I was determined not to look like the novice I was.

Studio 262 is a recent addition to South Los Angeles. Blocks away from the University of Southern California, the new space is becoming a hub for students as well as locals. Among their many class offerings, the one that caught my eye was trap yoga.

Trap yoga involves doing vinyasa flows to the beat of trap music, a bass-filled, gritty sub-genre of hip hop that originated in the South. It’s become somewhat of a gateway for people of color who wouldn’t feel at ease in typical yoga spaces, which are usually predominantly white and upper-class. Vaguely familiar with the practice from social media—where a search of the #trapyoga tag on Instagram shows a variety of skin tones, genders and body types—I was eager to experience it firsthand.

Source: #NamaSlay, Or How Black Women Are Using Trap Yoga as a Mode of Spiritual Resistance | Religion Dispatches