Census 2000 Uses Multiracial Categories, Tracks Growing Diversity

Source: USA TODAY

On April 2, 2001, USA TODAY reported that the huge population increase from 1990 to 2000 reported by Census 2000 was caused in large part by increased
immigration and higher birth rates among recent immigrants.


Census 2000 Uses Multiracial Categories, Tracks Growing Diversity

Source: Los Angeles Times

On March 13, 2001, the Los Angeles Times reported that, according to the 2000 census, “nearly one in every three Americans is a member of a minority group,
reflecting a massive surge in immigration during the 1990s.” The Latino and Asian populations are making the most rapid increases. “On initial analysis, the Census Bureau’s first attempt at giving respondents
the chance to choose more than one race may yield as much befuddlement as enlightenment.”


Census 2000 Uses Multiracial Categories, Tracks Growing Diversity

Source: Omaha World-Herald

On March 13, 2001, the Omaha World-Herald reported that, according to the Census 2000, “racial and ethnic minorities now make up about 7 percent of Iowa, compared
with about 4.5 percent in 1990.” The largest increase in population was among the Hispanic population. “The increase…has forced [Sioux City] to adapt. Interpreters are in
demand to assist with the Spanish-speaking population. Schools have adjusted
their programs.”


Census 2000 Uses Multiracial Categories, Tracks Growing Diversity

Source: The Atlanta Journal and Constitution

On March 13, 2001, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution reported that “according to results released by the Census Bureau…2.4 percent of
Americans, or nearly 7 million out of 281 million people, took advantage of the
new census option to identify themselves as belonging to more than one race…About 4 percent of Americans under age 18 were listed as multiethnic,
compared with about 2 percent of those 18 and over.”


Census 2000 Uses Multiracial Categories, Tracks Growing Diversity

Source: USA TODAY

On March 8, 2001, USA TODAY reported that “the first detailed Census 2000 numbers show…Hispanics [are at] the point of becoming the nation’s largest minority
group…The 2000 Census shows that the number of Hispanics grew almost
60% since 1990, to 35.3 million.” A demographer with
the Milken Institute in Santa Monica, Calif. calls this “an important
shift in American race relations.”


Census 2000 Uses Multiracial Categories, Tracks Growing Diversity

Source: Los Angeles Times

On March 5, 2001, the Los Angeles Times
reported that Census 2000 “is the first in which
Americans were invited to mark one or more races,
creating a total of 57 new
categories with anywhere from two to six races…
The census’ formalizing
of multiple-race answers…explodes the most basic notion of race: that there are discrete bio-cultural
groups of human beings,” and reflects four decades
of “vast demographic shifts.” Multiracial data will, among other
things, complicate
statisticians’ calculations, the issue of
voting rights and reapportionment, and anti-discrimination
monitoring and enforcement.”