Religious Diversity News

Showing all news articles.

Bradenton couple’s business fills a niche for Santeria practitioners – News

Tucked away amid a nondescript strip mall off Tamiami Trail is an equally unpretentious storefront barely visible from the road. But according to the eclectic fare advertised in Spanish and English on the picture window, this place would appear to have a monopoly on a highly specialized local niche market.

Offerings range from powders and books to readings and initiations, the store is called Botanica, generically defined as a shop that sells “traditional remedies” and other items associated with religion or spirituality. Accordingly, say Vicky and Gabriel Baeza Hasbun, the wife-husband team that owns and operates Botanica, its location here at 5225 14th St. West is neither accidental nor arbitrary

Source: Bradenton couple’s business fills a niche for Santeria practitioners – News – Daytona Beach News-Journal Online – Daytona Beach, FL

In the sacred stillness of Arlington National Cemetery

While many Americans perceive Veterans Day as just another holiday that features special sales at countless shopping malls, that is not my view of November 11th. It has always been a solemn season of remembrance.

Last week my wife, Marcia, and my nephew Andrew Rudin visited Arlington National Cemetery, where my father and mother are buried. We were there to visit my parents’ grave and to recite the traditional kaddish, the Jewish prayer that is said in memory of a deceased loved one.

Source: In the sacred stillness of Arlington National Cemetery – Religion News Service

Lexington Sikhs invite community to open celebration

Sunday is an important day in the faith of Sikhism; it’s the 550th anniversary of the founder’s birth. Sikhs in Lexington opened their doors to anyone who wanted to learn more, in honor of the special day.

When you walk into the Gurudwara, you take off your shoes and cover your head, just like in other Indian religions.

But Surjit Singh Dhrooper says people only see the similarities in common Indian culture

Source: Lexington Sikhs invite community to open celebration

Teacher-led Prayer: Unconstitutional but Appropriate?

There is no question that Americans could use a lesson or two on the Constitution and its amendments. The Freedom Forum Institute’s 2019 State of the First Amendment survey found that only 29 percent of respondents could name freedom of religion as one of the five freedoms safeguarded by the First Amendment. To protect religious freedom, we must educate the public about our inalienable rights.

But what should educators and legal literacy advocates do when people know the law but do not care if authority figures violate it? That is the question raised by a recent survey of teenagers, ages 13 to 17, conducted by the Pew Research Center.

Source: Teacher-led Prayer: Unconstitutional but Appropriate? | Religious Freedom Center of the Freedom Forum Institute

Muslim Americans win local races, despite hateful attacks

Safiya Khalid says the recent elections send a powerful message.

“You don’t win elections on the internet,” the 23-year-old said. “You win them at the doors.”

Khalid quit Facebook at one point during her campaign for a seat on the City Council of Lewiston, Maine, because she was getting so many hate-filled messages. Someone even posted her home address.

“I even saw one that said, ‘I will shoot you,’” she said. “One that said, ‘You should be stoned.’”

Source: Muslim Americans win local races, despite hateful attacks

Fake meat’s surprising evolution, from Buddhism to the Beyond Burger

While plant-based meat may seem new and buzzy, China began concocting it way before the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat burst onto the scene, CNN reports. What’s more, its creations have approximated a far richer array of fake meats, beyond the “burgers” trending in the West, emerging from a food culture that has long celebrated ingenuity.

In China, the practice of imitating meat has its roots in Buddhism, introduced to the country roughly 2,000 years ago, during the Han Dynasty, and still practiced by about a fifth of its population, according to CNN. Many Buddhists are vegetarian, and the monasteries in China adhered to a strict vegetarian diet. Monasteries began imitating meat to sate visitors’ carnivorous appetites while still using and consuming only plant-based products, swapping out meat for tofu, gluten, and vegetables, VICE reports.

Source: Fake meat’s surprising evolution, from Buddhism to the Beyond Burger

Here’s The Best Of #Jewish TikTok

It took me just five minutes of TikTok streaming to come upon a video of a teenager dressed as “Harry Potter” spinoff character Newt Scamander doing American Sign Language over a recording of comedian John Mulaney riffing on Jewish women.

Further down the page — an eye-rolling girl gave a tour of her parents’ mezuza collection, a boy in a hoodie reenacted the ancient conquests of Jerusalem with reality TV dialogue, and a girl and her mom bickered over an Israeli soap opera they call “Schnitzel.”

Source: Here’s The Best Of #Jewish TikTok – The Forward

Judge voids Trump-initiated rule letting clinicians refuse healthcare services on moral or religious grounds

A federal judge Wednesday struck down a new rule, not yet in effect, that allowed healthcare clinicians to refuse participation in abortions and other services on moral or religious grounds.

U.S. District Judge Paul A. Engelmayer in New York said he was tossing out the rule in its entirety.

The decision came after 19 states, the District of Columbia, three local governments, health organizations and others sued the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Source: Judge voids Trump-initiated rule letting clinicians refuse healthcare services on moral or religious grounds – Los Angeles Times

Neighborly Faith urges evangelicals to find a ‘third way’ to befriend Muslims

For evangelical Christians, the importance of evangelizing is right there in the name.

But it’s not the best approach to building relationships with Muslims and people of other faiths, according to Matthew Kaemingk, assistant professor of Christian ethics at Fuller Seminary and author of “Christian Hospitality and Muslim Immigration in an Age of Fear.”

“Muslims are not a mission or a project that you work on like a science experiment or something,” Kaemingk told an auditorium of young evangelicals Friday night (Nov. 1) at the Billy Graham Center for Evangelism at Wheaton College in the Chicago suburbs.

Source: Neighborly Faith urges evangelicals to find a ‘third way’ to befriend Muslims – Religion News Service

Sustainable Halal Meat is Making Inroads in Muslim Communities

On a tidy two-lane road outside Columbus, Ohio, a hand-painted sign in red and white script hangs on the edge of a corn field. It reads “Bismi Allah Farms,” derived from the Arabic phrase “bismillah,” meaning “in the name of Allah,” or God, and a word said in reverence by practicing Muslims numerous times a day.

But “farm” is a bit of a misnomer. The four-acre operation, run by Ahmed Fram, a Moroccan immigrant and his family, is actually a licensed halal slaughter facility, where a centuries-old, sacred religious ritual converges with modern demand in a two-car garage retrofitted for the task.

Source: Sustainable Halal Meat is Making Inroads in Muslim Communities | Civil Eats

We apologize if you have been experiencing outages with our website. We are working on fixing this in the short term and we will be launching an improved website later in 2019 that will not have the same issues. Thank you for your patience!
X
- Enter Your Location -
- or -