Religious Diversity News

Showing all news articles.

Kentucky Atheist Awarded $150,000 In Fight Over Vanity License Plates

If you’re looking for God, keep your eyes peeled for a white Jeep Grand Cherokee with custom Kentucky plates that read “IM GOD.”

You may not find the Almighty behind the wheel, but you’re likely at least to encounter Ben Hart. The self-identified atheist sued the state in 2016 after he was denied the vanity plate because it was “vulgar or obscene.”

Source: Kentucky Atheist Awarded $150,000 In Fight Over Vanity License Plates | HuffPost

Reggie Wilson’s Fist and Heel Performance Group finds inspiration in Black Shakers

For choreographer Reggie Wilson, who has dedicated decades to researching and illuminating the spiritual and cultural traditions of the African diaspora, Shakers would seem an unusual source of obsession. But when his investigations led to the discovery of a community of Black Shakers in the middle 1800s, he was all in. He’d always felt there was nothing “any whiter than a New England Shaker,” he admits with a chuckle. “Finding such a thing as a Black Shaker didn’t fit easily into my model of reality. I wanted to understand … how that existed and what that might have looked like.” That curiosity led Wilson to create his latest full-evening dance work, “POWER,” which he and his 31-year-old company Fist and Heel Performance Group present at the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston this weekend.

Source: Reggie Wilson’s Fist and Heel Performance Group finds inspiration in Black Shakers – The Boston Globe

Stresses multiply for many US clergy: ‘We need help too’

Greg Laurie is among America’s most successful clergymen — senior pastor at a California megachurch, prolific author, host of a global radio program. Yet after a youthful colleague’s suicide, his view of his vocation is unsparing.

“Pastors are people, just like everyone else,” Laurie said by email. “We are broken people who live in a broken world. Sometimes, we need help too.”

Source: Stresses multiply for many US clergy: ‘We need help too’ – ABC News

The Witches of Manitou Springs: History, hysteria and wand-waving Wiccans behind a stubborn urban myth

Manitou Springs, a picturesque mountain town nestled in the shadow of Pikes Peak, is full of whispers of witches and witchcraft.

Maybe you’ve heard it from an Uber driver on the way to an area bar or while scrolling through a travel site. It’s a tale that often wanders through word of mouth. Wherever it comes from, legend has it there are witches in Manitou Springs. More, perhaps, than usual.

Source: The Witches of Manitou Springs: History, hysteria and wand-waving Wiccans behind a stubborn urban myth – The Colorado Sun

Ahmadi Muslims mark 100 years in US with day of service

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is marking the 100-year anniversary of the sect’s beginnings in the U.S. with a day of prayer and community service at its 62 chapters across the country.

This weekend, in mosques in Boston, Chicago, Silicon Valley, Miami, Phoenix, North Jersey and Los Angeles, Ahmadi Muslims plan to prepare meals to donate at food pantries and distribute at area shelters. In Portland, members will plant trees; Austin members will volunteer at a local farm; in Richmond, Virginia, members plan to clean a historic cemetery; and Willingboro, New Jersey, members are holding a coat drive alongside local emergency service departments.

Source: Ahmadi Muslims mark 100 years in US with day of service – Religion News Service

Father Josh: A married Catholic priest in a celibate world

The priest wakes up at 4 a.m. on the days he celebrates the early Mass, sipping coffee and enjoying the quiet while his young children sleep in rooms awash in stuffed animals and Sesame Street dolls and pictures of saints. Then he kisses his wife goodbye and drives through the empty suburban streets of north Dallas to the church he oversees.

In a Catholic world where debates over clerical celibacy have flared from Brazil to the Vatican, Joshua Whitfield is that rarest of things: A married Catholic priest.

Source: Father Josh: A married Catholic priest in a celibate world – The Washington Post

Rabbis’ perspectives vary when it comes to co-officiating at interfaith funerals

With the rise of interfaith marriage, it is no surprise that families are seeking ways to meld the traditions of various faiths. From weddings performed jointly by clergy representing different religions, to the December holiday mashup “Christmakkah,” cultures and customs are being blended in ways unimaginable a century ago.

Interfaith funerals, co-officiated by a rabbi and a non-Jewish clergy member, while not yet ubiquitous, now can also be added to that canon.

Source: Rabbis’ perspectives vary when it comes to co-officiating at interfaith funerals | The Pittsburgh Jewish chronicle