10 Commandments Monuments Barred from Capital Lawns

Source: The Courier-Journal

On August 1, 2000, The Courier Journal reported that “In a written order that follows his ruling last week from the bench, U.S. District Judge Joseph Hood has struck down as unconstitutional a state resolution calling for a monument to the Ten Commandments on the Capitol grounds.” In his order, Hood found “the resolution failed all three constitutional tests it needed to pass.” These tests were that it had a “secular purpose, that its primary effect was secular and that it did not ‘foster’ a government entanglement with religion.” Supporters argued that the monument was “not an endorsement of religion but a shrine to the history of law in Kentucky.”


10 Commandments Monuments Barred from Capital Lawns

Source: The Washington Post

On July 30, 2000, The Washington Post reported that a “federal judge issued a temporary injunction Friday barring Indiana from erecting a Ten Commandments monument on the Statehouse lawn.” The state has not decided if it will appeal, said a spokeswoman for the governor. She added that “We believe that because this monument was to be displayed in a historical context it would be constitutional.” Indiana Civil Liberties Lawyer Ken Falk commented that “The judge indicated that…the monument lacks a secular purpose and it has the effect of endorsing a religious belief. Either one of those two is enough to render the law unconstitutional.”