Guru Nanak on Religious Freedom, 1994

In Washington, D.C. the editor of a SikhSikhs call their tradition the “Sikh Panth,” meaning the “community (panth) of the disciples of the Guru.” The tradition reveres a lineage of ten Gurus, beginning with Guru Nanak in the 16th century and coming to a clos. with the death of Guru Gob... newsletter reflected on the historic occasion of President Clinton’s signing of the Religious Freedom Restoration ActThe Religious Freedom Restoration Act was passed by Congress in 1995 to insure that the government show a “compelling governmental interest” in any restriction of religious freedom., an event at which SikhsSikhs call their tradition the “Sikh Panth,” meaning the “community (panth) of the disciples of the Guru.” The tradition reveres a lineage of ten Gurus, beginning with Guru Nanak in the 16th century and coming to a clos. with the death of Guru Gob... were present.


This was almost a hundred years after the first Sikh migrants came to North America. Today over 300,000 Sikhs have adopted United States as their home. As we grow here as a community future generations of Sikhs will carry on the universal and eternal message of Guru NanakGuru Nanak (1469-1539) was the first teacher of the community of disciples that became known as the Sikhs. His songs in praise of the formless and transcendent God are a cherished part of the Sikh scripture, the Adi Granth. in the United States. Our Gurus’ vision continues to hold true today in America as it was in India five hundred years ago—of a society where people are constantly aware of the Infinite within, where they live by honest labor and share with others.

[From The Newsletter of the Guru Gobind SinghGuru Gobind Singh (1666-1708) was the tenth Guru of the Sikh tradition. He is primarily known for establishing the community of Sikh initiates called the Khalsa and for installing the Adi Granth as his successor, thereby closing the line of Gurus. Foundation, Washington, D.C. (Spring 1994). By permission of the Guru Gobind SinghGuru Gobind Singh (1666-1708) was the tenth Guru of the Sikh tradition. He is primarily known for establishing the community of Sikh initiates called the Khalsa and for installing the Adi Granth as his successor, thereby closing the line of Gurus. Foundation.]