Atheism and Humanism Bibliography

Cave, Peter. HumanismHumanism is a belief system that values reason, compassion, and hope. Emphasis is placed on human concerns and that which can contribute to human flourishing. Dogmas or creeds that in any way impede these foci are disregarded and humanity is thought to be...: A Beginner’s Guide (London: Oneworld Publications), 2009.

Epstein, GregGreg Epstein (1977-) is the Humanist Chaplain at Harvard University, a leader in the founding of the Harvard Humanist Community Project, and author of Good Without God: What a Billion Nonreligious People Do Believe (2009). In 2005, Epstein was ordained as.... Good Without GodGod is a term used to refer to the Divine, the Supreme being, Transcendent deity, or Ultimate reality.: What a Billion NonreligiousMultivalent terms that often are used to describe people (or their worldview) who reject the practices, dogma, and creeds of established religious traditions. Some people, on the other hand, may identify as Humanist and also consider this either a belief ... People Do Believe (New York: HarperCollins), 2010.

Herrick, Jim. Humanism: An Introduction (Buffalo, New York: Prometheus Books), 2005.

Hitchcock, S.C. Disbelief 101: A Young Person’s Guide to Atheism (Tucson: See Sharp Press), 2009.

Kurtz, Paul. Eupraxophy: Living Without Religion (Buffalo, New York: Prometheus Books), 1989.

Kurtz, Paul. Humanist ManifestoThe Humanist Manifestos are a series of statements which outline the core beliefs of the Humanist movement. The first, A Humanist Manifesto (1933) was primarily written by Raymond Bragg with 34 co-signers and published in the May/June 1933 issue of the Ne... 2000: A Call for New Planetary Humanism (Buffalo, New York: Prometheus Books), 2000.

Kurtz, Paul (ed.). Humanist ManifestosThe Humanist Manifestos are a series of statements which outline the core beliefs of the Humanist movement. The first, A Humanist Manifesto (1933) was primarily written by Raymond Bragg with 34 co-signers and published in the May/June 1933 issue of the Ne... I and II (Buffalo, New York: Prometheus Books), 1984.

Kurtz, Paul. In Defense of Secular HumanismMultivalent terms that often are used to describe people (or their worldview) who reject the practices, dogma, and creeds of established religious traditions. Some people, on the other hand, may identify as Humanist and also consider this either a belief ... (Buffalo, New York: Prometheus Books), 1983.

Kurtz, Paul. The Transcendental Temptation: A Critique of Religion and the Paranormal (Buffalo, New York: Prometheus Books), 1991.

Kurtz, Paul. What Is Secular HumanismSecular humanism is the belief that ultimate values reside within the human individual and possess no supernatural origin; it has been shaped by Enlightenment rationalism, Darwinian science, and later by Freudian and post-Freudian psychology. The humanist...? (Buffalo, New York: Prometheus Books), 2007.

Lamont, Corliss. The Philosophy of Humanism (New York: The Continuum Publishing Company), 1990.

Sagan, CarlCarl Sagan (1934–1996) was an astronomer, astrophysicist, and author who played a leading role in establishing the American space program. His involvement with NASA spanned several decades, as did his teaching career at Cornell University where he serve... and Ann Druyan (eds.). The Varieties of Scientific Experience: A Personal View of the Search for GodThe term god with a small “g” is used to refer to a deity or class of deities whose power is understood to be circumscribed or localized rather than universal, or to refer to a plurality of deities. (New York: Penguin Books), 2007.

Seaman, Ann Rowe. America’s Most Hated Woman: The Life and Gruesome Death of Madalyn Murray O’Hair (New York: The Continuum Publishing Company), 2005.

Stedman, ChrisChris Stedman (1987-) is an openly gay atheist, interfaith activist, and Assistant Humanist Chaplain at Harvard University. He is founder of the blog Non-Prophet Status and is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. Stedman is author of the 2012 mem...Faitheist: How an AtheistMultivalent terms that often are used to describe people (or their worldview) who reject the practices, dogma, and creeds of established religious traditions. Some people, on the other hand, may identify as Humanist and also consider this either a belief ... Found Common Ground with the Religious (Boston: Beacon Press), 2012.